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. >>> japanese robots that look after the elderly, it sounds like science fiction but it's increasingly science fact and with good reason. japanese society is aging faster than any in the world. nursing facilities are stretched past capacity. against this backdrop, researchers are building new and humane intelligent machines. >> reporter: a new game is being played at this hold people's home south of tokyo. ♪ >> reporter: the residents move their bodies on cue from a robot. the exercise helps the brain and fights aging. people from the nursing industry interested in the robot came along to watch. >> translator: coming here today and seeing people talking and dancing with them made me realize that robots have become something very commonplace to old people, too. >> reporter: many of the nursing care robots are japanese inventions. they're catching the eye of facilities overseas. in some countries, they recognize the medical equipment. ironically, care giving robots have been slow to catch on in japan. people still expect the functions of caring to be given only by humans. but the situation may
. she has 51 of honorary degrees. she has been the first of everything -- the national science foundation. she was the very first black woman to get a ph.d. at and i.t.. [applause] she is an expert in medicare and medicaid and all things health. she has been called the health czar of america. the point guard over hauling the system. how about that for a job? what a powerhouse right here. so we actually have a lot of brainpower up here. all of you could have done very different things. you had a lot of choices. i would love to hear about how you ended up taking what you did. who wants to start? >> a failed of violinist. i was raised to be a musician. my mother still asks may what happened. i was always interested in politics and writing stories for the paper. it actually was complete serendipity. i was in college and was at a meeting of the naacp. we had some big issues. this was the 1960's and we heard music down the hall. it was the college radio station and i was drawn to it. i pitched in and begin programming classical music. and they needed somebody to help with the news. i
colonialism, ending cartels, spreading the fruits of science and technology around the world. and he had enemies. his enemies were the southern segregationist because he was the leading spokesperson for black civil rights, and a leads spokesperson for women's rights and the conservatives said america's fascistses are those that thing wall street comes first and the american people come second. so he had enemies and the enemies wantedded to get rid of him. but he was enormously popular. on july 20, 1944, the night the convention starts in california, gallup released a poll asking voters who they want on the ticket. 65% said they wanted wallace, 2% said they wanted harry truman the question how were the party bosses going to -- roosevelt was feeble and when they party bosses come to him and want to get wallace off the ticket, roosevelt says i want wallace but i can't fight this by myself. i i'm not strong enough, and he finally gave in, and it was table that he did. his family was furious. eleanor roosevelt was furious with him. every one of the roosevelt kids was furious. they were huge w
and imperialism and the economic exploitation spreading the fruit of science and technology are not of the world and the southern segregationist was the leading spokesperson, the antifeminist because he was the leader in the human rights of the party and the entire imperialists and the conservatives that said america's fascists are acting king wall street comes first and the american people second so we had enemies and they wanted to get rid of him on that ticket in 1944 but the problem was he was enormously popular. 65% they want wallace on the ticket and 2% said they wanted. truman that the question is how were they going to thwart this. roosevelt when the party busses started to come to him and they want to get the rottweilers of the tickets, roosevelt says to him i support him but i can't fight this campaign myself. i'm not strong enough. i'm depending on you guys to do it and he finally caved in and it was terrible that he did. his family was furious. every single one of them were furious. there were huge wallace supporters and he had the backing of labor and the black delegates at the conv
in the christian science monitor's 15 best books of 2012 nonfiction. in "reagan and thatcher: the difficult relationship," richard aldous, literary professor at bard college, argues that the relationship between former president ronald reagan and former british prime minister margaret thatcher was more tumultuous than they let the public believe. author renya grande in "the distance between us: a memoir." in "embers of war: the fall of an empire and the making of america's vietnam," frederick logevall. and seth rosenfeld in "subversives," for an extended list of links to various publications 2012 notable book selections, visit booktv's web site,, or our facebook page, >> two familiar faces to regular c-span and booktv watchers, norm ornstein and thomas mann. their most recent book, "it's even worse than it looks: how the american constitutional system collided with the new politics of extremism." mr. ornstein, very quickly, what's the premise of your book? >> first, i have to say, peter, that we've been with c-span since the beginning, and i've got pictures o
know science mismatch is a problem, that although blacks are more likely than whites to nature when they go to college, they're much less like you to get stem degrees, science engineering that degrees if they receive preference. university of virginia found to be taped to blacks or two students of any color, one who receives a preference, one who doesn't, the preference is a 40% larger chance of dropping out of science on this path through. mismatch also affects academic inclined students who receive much preferences for that to become university professors are going to academics someday. predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class in the side economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california were voters passed proposition 209 a large cause a natural experiment of what happens when preferences are banned from entire university system. the results aren't extremely curt for anyone who bothers to look. but then i have to nurse at implementation of research quality, the number of blacks in the university of california system
research has been done, published in excellent journals. so we now know that science mismatch is a pervasive problem. although blacks are more like listen than similar whites to want to major in science and engineering when they go to college, they're much less likely to get what we call s.t.e.m. degrees if they receive a large preference. a study at the university of virginia found that if you take two blacks or two students of any color, one of whom receives a large presence, one whom momentum, the student who receives a preference has about a 0% larger -- 40% larger chance of dropping out on his way through. mismatch also accepts academically-inclined students who would like to go into academics someday but very predominantly receive low academic grades, cluster at the bottom of the class and decide that economics is not for them. the biggest mismatch experiment was in california where voters passed proposition 209, and we had a large quasi-natural experiment of what happens when racial preferences are banned from an entire university system. the results of prop 209 are ext
, should we think more about it. should we think more about the science about it. they are saying that we should spin off more great technology. it's another great competition. >> i love the change in mr. webb a year later. the president is basically asking, is this a top priority. and he said oh, absolutely. [laughter] >> i think he also asks how else it can be done. is there a way of doing this. perhaps this shifts from kennedy's own cold war. >> part of what i want to understand, if this meeting is taking place about a year and a half after the state of the union speech, here it is a year and a half later, and the government isn't really on board. and you think, my god. >> i can confirm that that is often the case. but the written document i've seen on display in this library, why is it being done right now? what we do in the next 24 hours. he really was on it. but i think it's worth pointing out that in 1963, which it was a very different year from 1962. but the cold war had calm down a big notch after the cuban missile crisis. and khrushchev and kennedy were working closely together
this freakish weather and all the sciences is so overwhelming about claimant count yet you don't see on the nightly news. is there a story that you wanted to grab by the scruff of the neck during her tenure at abc and say, we've got to cover this more? >> there were several. we would have discussions about. one of them was the environment and how we covered the environment. and every time we try to do a primetime special environment we wouldn't get a rating. that led, it's one of the chapters i write about, what i do not come across well. we had leonardo dicaprio india president clinton. we got killed for it. we did a primetime environmental special, and he was chairman of earth day that you and i thought he would just make an appearance. i got killed for. that was an attempt to try to cover the environment in a serious way and drive an audience. i was concerned, frankly, about our terrorism coverage. we did more terrorism coverage than others did before 9/11. jon miller went in and interviewed bin laden, trekked into the mountains in afghanistan and interviewed him. we get a primeti
of quotations spreading science and technology around the world. and he had enemies. his enemies were the southern segregationist, the antifeminist because he was the leader for women's rights women's rights in the anti-imperialist and can service. he said america's fascist think wall street comes first in the american people come second. he had enemies and those enemies wanted to get rid of him on the ticket. the problem was he was enormously popular. on july 20, 1944 the night the convention starts the potential potus who they wanted on the ticket as vice president, 65% said they wanted wallace on the ticket in 2% wanted harry truman so the question where how worth it party bosses going to take to this? when they wanted to get wallace off the ticket roosevelt says to him my support wallace but i can't fight this campaign myself. i'm not strong enough and i'm depending on you to do it. they finally gave in and it was terrible that he did. his family was serious. eleanor roosevelt was furious with him. every single one of the roosevelt kids were furious with him. wallace had the backi
out of the equal protects clause that depends on social science evidence. and i think if the social science evidence is indeterminant, which it is, then we shouldn't be discriminating against people on the basis of race. >> roger, could i -- >> stuart -- >> quick point on s.t.e.m. grads. our point on s.t.e.m. grads isn't that we need more of them, maybe we do. our point is that when students, black or hispanic students go to college wanting to be s.t.e.m. majors, they should not be misled to go to colleges where they have very little chance of becoming s.t.e.m. majors. >> okay. the gentleman up here in the blue shirt. >> greg squires from george washington university. and previous board member of the woodstock institute where mr. sander was at for a while. i have a simple question for roger clegg. you gave us some numbers on the percentage of people born out of wedlock of various groups. what do you think accounts for those patterns? >> well, that's a very interesting question. and i'll tell you one thing that i think momentum account for it -- i think doesn't account for it. i don'
universities and allow more education in science and mathematics in the school system which would allow more people to do research in this field. to allow more electric energy instead of so much depending on petroleum and oil. guest: about the education system. the second question is about the role of private enterprise in these technologies. education is the silver bullet and the thing that we can do most cheaply and easily to get kids excited about solving big problems. it needs to begin not in universities but at elementary and high school level education. every year we choose 35 young innovators who we believe have the greatest capacity to change the world. this year most of the 35 lived and worked in the united states, less than five had gone to elementary school in the united states. they came from china, europe, israel. we are not doing a good job in the states in making science and technology a profitable activity, where kids can commit their entire lives and careers to it. the best thing we can do is to invest in science and technology and mathematics education in our elementary and
's a science. >> you say it's so -- the worst part of it is that you go in, you think that people are looking at you. and then you start acting really weird. and then they stop you. >> you're pair reside. don't be paranoid, but then they are, actually, because you've been stopped at the door and they want to see your receipt. >> do you think you're being profiled? >> no. >> because he's wearing that jacket. they're profiling people -- >> now i order online so i don't have to worry about it. you can shop in your underwear. it's great. i was born for the internet. also you also like when he talks about how to lose weight. i love the simplicity of it and you say if you don't want to be fat, stop eating and you say that you have credibility on this for a good reason. >> there is a difference between, and you have to know this difference. what you want and what you want to want. i know someone when i first met her 20 years ago, she made a joke about being on a diet, but she was always on a diet and i saw her 15 years later and made a joke about her diet. after 15 years, you are still on a diet, yo
of the arts in favor of science, in favor of technology but it strikes me that what you just said and the context of the book and the fact that we still have the sort of need for the untold stories for the dark secrets is indicative of a kind of historical illiteracilliterac y that exists in our country and that african-americans and that black history in africana history itself with the subject that is most unknown or he raced from our collective consciousness. do you think that historical illiteracy contributes to our present and even to our future? do you see the larger story that you tell here as essential to your vision of the country we ought to live in? >> i don't know that i have thought about it in that way. what i definitely thought about was how reflective her family was of the american story and i wanted very much to imbue it with the history so that people could see that her family had front row seats to some of the most important moments in our history slavery, civil war emancipation, the migration, jim crow, the depression and that all their steps forward and steps
% in 2011. if you went into nursing 30 years ago, you didn't anticipate this. that's what happens as science e evolves and things change. requirements change. >> i want to talk about another subject because everybody is talking about it. the hannah storm, the fire that explodes from the girl. what happened in that situation to her? a lot of people think is this uncommon to be in that kind of situation where it's dangerous and don't realize the gas is on and v an explosion. >> you have the gas on, and you think it's lit. what happened in this situation is she came back and it wasn't lit. she went to relight it and all of this propane had been gathering during that time. propane is heavy, and it was just sitting there. of course, you can't see it, but she was not lighting just a small amount of gas at that point. she was unknowingly lighting a large amount of gas and han explangs. when you light a propane grill and if it goes out and doesn't work, you can't just relight it immediately because you've got much more gas in front of you you. >> we're looking at the pictures of the injuries, the bu
him, and he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> we're following the breaking news here in washington. house republican leaders, they are meeting right now, they are trying to decide whether to vote on the senate's fiscal cliff bill that passed in a lopsided 89-8 majority in the middle of the night. many republican lawmakers, though, have grave concerns about the lack of spending cuts in the senate-passed bill and they could decide to amend the measure, send it back to the house. tom foreman is working this for us. tom, how big of a complication would this be? >> this is massive, wolf. i can't even say how big it is. i'm standing inside of our virtual senate where last night a lot of people thought solutions were under way as they passed all of these different measures that would have something to do with the fiscal cliff but on the other side of the capitol, on the house side, dark clouds have been gathering all day long because there are some things that were passed here that the house
Search Results 0 to 15 of about 16